Loft Blog
FUSE: Makey-Makey Explosion! PDF Print E-mail
Tuesday, 30 September 2014 14:36

titleGummy bears and play-doh everywhere! Talk about a Makey-Makey explosion! If you've never tried your hand at Makey-Makeys, you don't know what you're missing. At last Saturday's FUSE, teens experimented with Makey-Makeys--a board that uses alligator clips to connect to conductive objects in order to create circuits.

 

Teens created pianos from cinnamon gummy bears, blobs of play-doh and even a banana, as well as controllers for games such as Dance-Dance-Revolution and Tetris. The first step in figuring out Makey-Makeys is figuring out how to make a complete circuit--finding "earth" and becoming "grounded." Once you've got that down, the possibilities are endless.

 

We explored the Makey-Makey website that is full of tons of great links, helpful tips, and games that can be played with the boards. But you can surf the web to find plenty of games to try with Makey-Makeys. 

 

 title 

 Come and join us every Saturday from 12-2 at FUSE to try your hand with Makey-Makeys or one of our other scientifically-based challenges such as 3D printing or Lego robotics. 

We hope to see you there! 

-the Loft Staff

 

 
Half Bad / Sally Green PDF Print E-mail
Monday, 29 September 2014 00:00

altNathan is the son of the most feared and wanted Black Witch, Marcus .  It’s something that makes him an outcast in society, even with his own family at times and also makes him the key to the Council’s plan to eliminate his father.  The Council of White Witches is determined to prove that while, his mother was a White Witch and his father a Black Witch, Nathan is definitely becoming a Black Witch. 

The book opens and Nathan has been living in a cage for quite a while under the “care” of a White Witch. Through flashbacks the reader finds out about everything that Nathan had to go through in order to avoid being captured and how the Council finally trapped him.  Half Bad is a twisted witch story unlike any other.  Nathan’s struggles and obstacles he must overcome in order to become the witch he’s meant to be, keep you riveted in your seat.  There’s action, suspense, mind games and a bit of romance. Sally Green has created a brilliant world of two warring factions of witches and what lengths they’ll go to eliminate each other. 

(Renee, the Loft)
 
Fuse / Julianna Baggott PDF Print E-mail
Monday, 29 September 2014 00:00

titleIn this exciting sequel to Pure, author Julianna Baggott continues the story of a rag-tag group of detonation survivors struggling to find justice in a destroyed world of misery and beauty. At the core of the group are Patridge and Pressia, half-siblings from wholly different lives and with widely different outlooks on how to change the future.

 

Pressia was seven when the world ignited and remembers little from the "before" while Patridge is a Pure--a boy who has grown up in the Dome, free of suffering and scars and death. Pressia believes the Dome to be a place where the wretch's suffering can end but Patridge knows better. The dome is not as peaceful and all-encompassing an Eden as it may seem--there are dark truths lurking in the shadows. 

 

The two were thrown together for a reason--set on a path years before by people they'd never met--and now they alone hold the power to set the world right again. Giving each other a short span of time to accomplish separate goals, Pressia and Patridge part ways, hoping to reunite under more favorable circumstances.

 

Risking friendships, a first love, and everything Patridge has gained on the outside, Patridge returns to the Dome to face a terrifying enemy--his own father. Pressia, along with El Capitan and Bradwell, risks her life to brave a trip across worlds to retrieve a mysterious tool that promises an end to the Dome. Along the way she discovers deeper feelings for the men she’s traveling with, finding it harder and harder to dismiss them as friends.

 

The only way the Dome will fall is if Patridge’s father is no longer in charge. But does Partidge have the courage to kill his only remaining family? In a world already burned and stripped away to nothing, it’s hard to imagine a hopeful populace but it’s here and it’s rising against the Dome, steadily building a resentful and restless army—a Fuse waiting to ignite. Baggott leaves readers aching for the conclusion and the story picks up immediately in Burn, the final book of the Pure trilogy.

 

(Ashley, the Loft)

 

 
From Teens For Teens: Paper Towns / John Green and Dork Diaries 2 / Rachel Renee Russell PDF Print E-mail
Friday, 26 September 2014 00:00

Paper TownsPaper Towns by John Green

An amazing book filled with both subtext and plot that I couldn't put down. If you like realistic fiction mysteries, this is definitely a book for you.

(Sarah B., Evanston teen)

 

 

Tales From A Not-so-popular Party GirlDork Diaries 2: Tales from a Not-So-Popular Party Girl by Rachel Renée Russell

Renée
RenéeRussell

Man, this book is AWESOME! Love how the author compares this to a person's life and how girls are when it comes to boys sometimes. This book is about Nikki who has some problems, gets embarrassed but still gets one thing that she has wanted or has wished for. I would recommend this book to anybody who thinks that they've done some dorky stuff in the past to see how Nikki Maxwell deals with it and what happened to her. Great Book!

(Ivette C., Evanston teen)

 
The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian / Sherman Alexie PDF Print E-mail
Wednesday, 24 September 2014 15:24

Arnold “Junior” Spirit has a lot going against him: poor, born with a brain injury and a speech impediment, nerdy, and a body built like a lollipop -- oversized head and lanky limbs. Except for his best friend, Rowdy, all his peers on the Indian reservation love to bully him. Junior uses cartooning to express his feeling around him, for he often feels that words fail to fully capture his experience. 

Cover image for Many people on the reservation are alcoholics or simply resigned to settling for lives that fall short of their dreams, limited by poverty and lack of opportunity. Junior can’t help but dream of something more. He decides to attend high school at the wealthy Reardan, 22 miles off the reservation, where he is the only Indian kid in school and endures merciless teasing and pressure to hide his true self. To make things worse, Rowdy feels so betrayed by Junior’s decision that he ends their friendship.

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian documents Junior’s attempts to find his own identity as he treks (sometimes, literally) between the two worlds of Reardan and “the rez”, neither of which feels like a perfect fit. He navigates romance, racism, and relationships with straight-shooting honest and a sense of humor.

Sherman Alexie’s semi-autobiographical novel does a great job at depicting life as a contemporary Native American, debunking many media stereotypes and shattering the notion of “otherness” that is sometimes forced upon his culture. The quirky drawings that accompany the story, courtesy of illustrator Ellen Forney, provide an even deeper insight into the head of this “part-time Indian” young man.

I loved this book so much that I binge-read it in a day; it’s a humorous and heartfelt read. I highly recommend The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian to anyone who knows what it’s like to always feel a little out of place and to dream of something bigger. 

(Kayla, The Loft)


DID YOU KNOW? Banned Books week is September 21st through September 27th.

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian made the official ALA List of Banned or Challenged Books for 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013.

Check it out in The Loft today!

 
Get Caught Reading Banned Books PDF Print E-mail
Tuesday, 23 September 2014 00:00

Help us celebrate Banned Book Week 2014 by taking a mugshot with your favorite banned book! Here are a few of ours: 

title

The Handmaid's Tale, by Margaret Atwood

Set in the near future, Margaret Atwood's most popular and compelling novel describes life in what once was the US, now the Republic of Gilead. Reacting to social unrest, and a sharply declining birthrate, the new regime has reverted to--even gone beyond--the repressive tolerance of the original Puritans. Women are no longer allowed to read and young women are valued only as long as their ovaries are viable. Atwood's scathing satire is funny, unexpected, horrifying, and altogether convincing.

*This book stands at number 88 on the American Library Association's "100 Most Frequently Challenged Books of 2000-2009" and is usually challenged due to its regular place on high school required reading lists.*  

 

title

Persepolis, by Marjane Satrapi

A New York Times Notable Book A Time Magazine "Best Comix of the Year" A San Francisco Chronicle and Los Angeles Times Best-seller Wise, funny, and heartbreaking, Persepolis is Marjane Satrapi's memoir of growing up in Iran during the Islamic Revolution. In powerful black-and-white comic strip images, Satrapi tells the story of her life in Tehran from ages six to fourteen, years that saw the overthrow of the Shah's regime, the triumph of the Islamic Revolution, and the devastating effects of war with Iraq. The intelligent and outspoken only child of committed Marxists and the great-granddaughter of one of Iran's last emperors, Marjane bears witness to a childhood uniquely entwined with the history of her country. Persepolis paints an unforgettable portrait of daily life in Iran and of the bewildering contradictions between home life and public life. Marjane's child's-eye view of dethroned emperors, state-sanctioned whippings, and heroes of the revolution allows us to learn as she does the history of this fascinating country and of her own extraordinary family. Intensely personal, profoundly political, and wholly original, Persepolis is at once a story of growing up and a reminder of the human cost of war and political repression. It shows how we carry on, with laughter and tears, in the face of absurdity. And, finally, it introduces us to an irresistible little girl with whom we cannot help but fall in love. - See more at: http://evanston.bibliocommons.com/item/show/815097035_persepolis#sthash.xwgvae0m.dpuf

Marjane Satrapi's multiple award-winning memoir is about growing up in Iran during the Islamic Revolution. In powerful black-and-white comic strip images, Satrapi tells the story of her early life in Tehran. Intensely personal, profoundly political, and wholly original, Persepolis is at once a story of growing up and a reminder of the human cost of war and political repression. It shows how we carry on, with laughter and tears, in the face of absurdity.

*Last year, Persepolis was challenged and removed from Chicago Public School classrooms and libraries. This decision was reconsidered after protests from students, teachers, and other community members.* 

  

title

Slaughterhouse-Five, by Kurt Vonnegut

Selected by the Modern Library as one of the 100 best novels of all time, Slaughterhouse-Five, an American classic, is one of the world's great antiwar books. Centering on the infamous firebombing of Dresden, Billy Pilgrim's odyssey through time reflects the mythic journey of our own fractured lives as we search for meaning in what we fear most.

*Slaughterhouse-Five is number 46 on the ALA's "Most Frequently Challenged Books of 2000-2009" and is most often challenged when it's listed as required or recommended reading in high schools.*

 

 
Banned Books Week 2014 PDF Print E-mail
Sunday, 21 September 2014 00:00

Celebrate the freedom to read during Banned Books Week 2014: September 21-27.

Public libraries strive to provide users with the books they want to read, the movies they want to see, the games they want to play, and the music they want to hear. Sometimes challenges are submitted by individuals or groups requesting that items be removed from the shelves for offensive material. But we think YOU should decide what you should and shouldn't read, see, play, and hear--we trust you!

Every year, the American Library Association's Office for Intellectual Freedom compiles a list of the most frequently challenged books. Here are the top three from 2013: 

The Adventures of Captain Underpants Captain Underpants (series), by Dav Pilkey

Fourth graders George Beard andHarold Hutchins are a couple of class clowns. The only thing they enjoy more than playing practical jokes is creating their own comic books. And together they've created the greatest superhero in the history of their school: Captain Underpants! His true identity is SO secret, even HE doesn't know who he is! - See more at: http://evanston.bibliocommons.com/item/show/2267960035_the_adventures_of_captain_underpants#sthash.YRj9b1Dd.dpuf
Fourth graders George Beard andHarold Hutchins are a couple of class clowns. The only thing they enjoy more than playing practical jokes is creating their own comic books. And together they've created the greatest superhero in the history of their school: Captain Underpants! His true identity is SO secret, even HE doesn't know who he is! - See more at: http://evanston.bibliocommons.com/item/show/2267960035_the_adventures_of_captain_underpants#sthash.YRj9b1Dd.dpuf

Fourth graders George Beard and Harold Hutchins are a couple of class clowns. The only thing they enjoy more than playing practical jokes is creating their own comic books. And together they've created the greatest superhero in the history of their school: Captain Underpants! His true identity is SO secret, even HE doesn't know who he is! 

*Challenged for offensive language, unsuitability for age group, and violence.* 

Cover image for The bluest eyeThe Bluest Eye, by Toni Morrison

This is the story of eleven-year-old Pecola Breedlove, a black girl who prays for her eyes to turn blue so that she will be beautiful, so that people will look at her, so that her world will be different. This is the story of the nightmare at the heart of her yearning, and the tragedy of its fulfillment.

*Challenged for offensive language, sexual explicitness, unsuitability for age group, and violence.*

The Absolutely True Diary of A Part-time IndianThe Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, by Sherman Alexie

Budding cartoonist Junior leaves his troubled school on the Spokane Indian Reservation to attend an all-white farm town school where the only other Indian is the school mascot.

*Challenged for drugs/alcohol/smoking, offensive language, racism, sexual explicitness, and unsuitability for age group.*

 
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next > End >>

Page 7 of 84
JavaScript disabled or chat unavailable.
Follow Us!
EPL Facebook Page Twitter badge The Loft on Tumblr The Loft on Instagram


Free template 'colorfall2' by [ Anch ] Gorsk.net Studio. Please, don't remove this hidden copyleft!