Readers' Services

The Readers’ Services staff can help you find specific materials and can offer reading suggestions. Please phone (847) 448-8620 for assistance. Use Novelist, to find reviews, reading guides, and reading lists for fiction lovers.

A Court of Thorns and Roses & A Court of Mist and Fury

altMaas, Sarah. A Court of Thorns and Roses. 2015. (YA Fiction Mass.S)

Maas, Sarah. A Court of Mist and Fury. 2016. (YA Fiction Mass.S)

This is my new favorite series…ever!  At first, I had to be sold on the idea of a YA fantasy novel that involved faeries and such but I am so glad I stuck with it.  The first book introduces you to Feyre (Fay-ruh), our illiterate heroine, who is badass and snarky and can completely hold her own.  She is no delicate flower nor does she apologize for getting what she wants/needs from who/what she must.  It is really refreshing to read a YA novel OR a romance novel where the girl is not some untouched pure little being that is going to be corrupted.  Because this series is both – it’s YA and romance, make no mistake because the second book, in particular, is filled with HOT scenes.  Really, you read the first to get to the second and, at 600+ pages, it still is not enough.  I read these twice, back-to-back, because I knew there was nothing that was going to satisfy me until the 3rd book in the trilogy comes out in May 2017 except more of the first two – it is that good.  (Kim - Reader's Services)

 

Early Warning

titleSmiley, Jane. Early Warning. 2015. (Fiction Smile.J)

The second part of Smiley's trilogy (part 1-Some Luck; part 3-The Golden Age) chronicling the Langdon family takes us away from the Iowa farm setting as the generation of  Langdons born between 1920 and 1952 grow up, move away, get married, have families. This installment covers the years 1953 to 1986. Wow--a lot has happened! I'm glad I'm of an age that lived most of this stuff because history is shown through vignettes of how members of this extended family are involved with these events. I can't help but wonder what Gen-Xers or younger would make of often broad allusions to major events--Cuban missile crisis, assassinations, Jim Jones and the mass suicides, housewives on tranquilizers, AIDS, and more. Would they "get it," how important these things were? How deeply did their high school history books go into this period so fraught with cultural upheavals? I wonder if the overriding motif of how much history shapes families and individuals might be lost on younger readers. Regardless, I enjoyed this view of history as I followed along with the trials, tribulations and travails of the Langdon family.

(Barbara L., Reader's Services)

   

The Defender

title

Michaeli, Ethan. The Defender: How the Legendary Black Newspaper Changed America. 2016. 071.7311 Micha.E.

I knew The Defender was highly influential in Chicago, especially on the south side, but I didn't know about its national reach. For much of the 20th century the newspaper was near the epicenter of the nation's social and political turbulence. It swayed the elections of Chicago mayors, of course, but also the elections of U.S. presidents such as Truman and Kennedy. An individual copy of the paper, picked up by a Pullman porter in Chicago, might be read by a dozen train-travelers in a dozen states.

White readers who spend time with Michaeli's sweeping history will gain an understanding of our country from a new vantage point. It's a little like growing up on familiar radio hits, or Old Town folk music, and stepping for the first time into a hopping blues club. You feel out of place, then you realize the story is partly your own.

Mr. Michaeli will be at the library on Thursday, July 21 to talk about his book.

(Jeff B., Reader's Services)

   

Troublemaker and Troublemaker 2

title

Evanovich, Janet. Troublemaker. 2010. (741.5973 Evano. J bk. 1), Troublemaker 2. 2011. (741.5973 Evano.J bk 2)

I am going to admit something here: I don’t like graphic novels. I find them incredibly frustrating to read. To me, the addition of images for every couple of lines of dialogue is more of a distraction than an enhancement of the story. But, in an effort to more widely read across genres, I decided to give the Troublemaker books a try. They’re written by an author that I love—Janet Evanovich, and her daughter Alex, with art by Joelle Jones—and are the third and fourth in a series that also includes Metro Girl and Motor Mouth (both full length novels, and not of the graphic variety). The series follows Alex “Barney” Barnaby, who is a mechanic for Sam Hooker, famous NASCAR driver. When their friend, Rosa, is kidnapped by a voodoo priest, Barney, Sam, and Sam’s giant St. Bernard, Beans, set out to find her. As the title of the books suggest, trouble ensues, but not without a few laughs along the way. The story is split into two parts, so be sure to check them both out at the same time so you aren’t left with a cliffhanger. While these books didn’t necessarily change my opinion about graphic novels, I didn’t hate them. I just think I would have enjoyed the story more in a typical novel format. But for those who really love graphic novels, these are a light and fun read. (Jeny, Reader's Services)

 

   

The Marriage of Opposites

titleHoffman, Alice. The Marriage of Opposites. 2015. (Fiction Hoffm.A)

Often called the Father of Impressionism, Camille Pissarro was born in St. Thomas, Virgin Islands in 1830. In Hoffman's imagined life of the artist based loosely on facts, the novel's first half is taken up with the artist's mother and her rebellious nature and how the tiny Jewish community on the island shuts the family out. When the child Pissarro makes his appearance, he too is a rebel. Hoffman's writing throughout this book is spotty. Her prose was wonderful when describing the lush island environment and how a young artist sees the world. I found the sections set in Paris to have stronger plot lines that, alas, deserved more attention by the author. I was befuddled by the title--an alchemical term that refers to the blending of elements to produce something new. There is no strong theme in the book relating to this metaphor, or it's so obscure I missed it. My biggest problem was Hoffman's repetition: we hear over and over how the Jewish community shunned the family, or how Pissarro hated book learning and his father's business. She doesn't "show" us, she just keeps saying it. However, despite all that, my book club had a very nice discussion and the art history aspect was very illuminating. So...I guess this is a two-thumbs-sideways review.

(Barbara L., Reader's Services)

   

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