Events

titleTuesday, January 31, 7 pm, Seminar Room, 3rd Floor, Main Library

Over the last half-billion years, there have been Five mass extinctions, when the diversity of life on earth suddenly and dramatically contracted. Scientists around the world are currently monitoring the sixth extinction, predicted to be the most devastating extinction event since the asteroid impact that wiped out the dinosaurs. This time around, the cataclysm is us. In prose that is at once frank, entertaining, and deeply informed, New Yorker writer Elizabeth Kolbert tells us why and how human beings have altered life on the planet in a way no species has before. Interweaving research in half a dozen disciplines, descriptions of the fascinating species that have already been lost, and the history of extinction as a concept, Kolbert provides a moving and comprehensive account of the disappearances occurring before our very eyes. She shows that the sixth extinction is likely to be mankind's most lasting legacy, compelling us to rethink the fundamental question of what it means to be human.

Copies of The Sixth Extinction will be held at the Reader's Services desk on the 2nd floor; stop by or call 847-448-8620. Please check the Keepinitreal Blog for author interviews, fun facts, and interesting videos.

 

titleTuesday, November 29, 7 pm, Seminar Room, 3rd Floor, Main Library

In the tiny Iowa farm town of Atalissa, dozens of men, all with intellectual disability and all from Texas, lived in an old schoolhouse. Before dawn each morning, they were bussed to a nearby processing plant, where they eviscerated turkeys in return for food, lodging, and $65 a month. They lived in near servitude for more than thirty years, enduring increasing neglect, exploitation, and physical and emotional abuse—until state social workers, local journalists, and one tenacious labor lawyer helped these men achieve freedom.

Copies of The Boys in the Bunkhouse will be held at the Reader's Services desk on the 2nd floor; stop by or call 847-448-8620. Please check the Keepinitreal Blog for author interviews, fun facts, and interesting videos.

 

titleTuesday, October 25, 7 pm, Seminar Room, 3rd Floor, Main Libraryalt

Missoula, Montana, is a typical college town, home to a highly regarded state university whose beloved football team inspires a passionately loyal fan base. Between January 2008 and May 2012, hundreds of students reported sexual assaults to the local police. Few of the cases were properly handled by either the university or local authorities. In this, Missoula is also typical.

Copies of Missoula will be held at the Reader's Services desk on the 2nd floor; stop by or call 847-448-8620. Please check the Keepinitreal Blog for author interviews, fun facts, and interesting videos.

Co-sponsored by the Frances Willard Historical Association.

   

titleTuesday, September 27, 7 pm, Seminar Room, 3rd Floor, Main Library

In the 1980s, a young adventurer and collector for a government library, Abdel Kader Haidara, journeyed across the Sahara Desert and along the Niger River, tracking down and salvaging tens of thousands of ancient Islamic and secular manuscripts that had fallen into obscurity. This book tells the incredible story of how Haidara, a mild-mannered archivist and historian from the legendary city of Timbuktu, later became one of the world’s greatest and most brazen smugglers.

In 2012, thousands of Al Qaeda militants from northwest Africa seized control of most of Mali, including Timbuktu. They imposed Sharia law, chopped off the hands of accused thieves, stoned to death unmarried couples, and threatened to destroy the great manuscripts. As the militants tightened their control over Timbuktu, Haidara organized a dangerous operation to sneak all 350,000 volumes out of the city to the safety of southern Mali.

Copies of The Bad-Ass Librarians of Timbuktu will be held at the Reader's Services desk on the 2nd floor; stop by or call 847-448-8620. Please check the Keepinitreal Blog for author interviews, fun facts, and interesting videos.

 

titleTuesday, August 30, 7 pm, Seminar Room, 3rd Floor, Main Library

In this illuminating and dramatic biography, Nina Burleigh reveals a little-known slice of social and intellectual history in the life and times of the man responsible for the creation of the United States' principal cultural institution, the Smithsonian. It was one of the nineteenth century's greatest philanthropic gifts -- and one of its most puzzling mysteries. In 1829, a wealthy English naturalist named James Smithson left his library, mineral collection, and entire fortune to the "United States of America, to found ... an establishment for the increase & diffusion of Knowledge among men" -- even though he had never visited the United States or known any Americans.

Copies of The Stranger and the Statesman will be held at the Reader's Services desk on the 2nd floor; stop by or call 847-448-8620. Please check the Keepinitreal Blog for author interviews, fun facts, and interesting videos.

   

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